ENG 099 Basic Composition (3 credits)

This is a developmental writing course for students who need more individualized instruction and intensive practice in composing and editing short expository prose than is provided in ENG 103. This course does not satisfy Freshman English credit requirements. (Additional tutoring in the Writing Skills Center may be required.) This foundational course provides 3 equivalent credit hours toward a full-time load and is based on 3 equivalent credit hours; it carries 0 credit hours of academic credit. Prerequisite: Onondaga Community College placement test. Students who have taken the Level of English Proficiency (LOEP) as part of their placement examination may not register for ENG 099. They must register for ESL 115, ESL 116, or ENG 103, as specified on their placement test summary.

ENG 103 Freshman Composition and Literature I (3 credits)

This course develops the skills and forms necessary for writing college-level expository prose. Methods for developing content; organizing information and ideas; and presenting that material to a reader clearly, concisely, and coherently will be taught. Various readings may be used as a source of models and ideas. Prerequisite: Onondaga Community College placement test and/or satisfactory completion of ENG 099 or ESL 116.

ENG 104 Freshman Composition and Literature II (3 credits)

Teaches students to comprehend, respond to and use the ideas of others in their own writing. Skills such as analytic and critical reading and writing, summarizing, and paraphrasing are developed through the study of literature. Term paper form will also be taught. Prerequisite: ENG 103.

ENG 121 News Literacy (3 credits)

This course is a survey of the ongoing changes in mass media with a focus on news literacy. Students will be introduced to the skills required to make critical evaluations of news and information sources across the spectrum of traditional and new media, assessing the content for such factors as diversity, accuracy, and bias. Prerequisite: English and reading placement at college level. Students may not receive credit for both ENG 121 and COM 121. Web-enhanced course; online assignments are required.

ENG 122 Introduction to Journalism (3 credits)

This course will be a survey of the background and importance of journalism in society, including its role in democracy, key stories that shaped history, standard-bearers across news platforms, and the principles and responsibilites essential for fair and credible news reporting. Prerequisite: English and Reading placement at college level. Web enhanced course; online assignments are required.

ENG 123 Student Media Reporting (1 credit)

This course provides academic credit to students who contribute to student-run college media. Submissions can range from small pieces, such as calendar items and captions, to longer pieces, such as news stories, features, and reviews, for those with more interest and experience in news writing. Students may not receive credit for both ENG 123 and COM 123. Prerequisite: English and reading placement at college level. Web enhanced course; online assignments are required.

ENG 157 Electronic Media Writing (3 credits)

This course helps students to master the diverse writing styles and formats used in writing for broadcast on radio, television and cable. These include public service announcements (PSAs), station IDs, promotional announcements, script formats, commercials, news copy, and program materials. Emphasis is on developing broadcast copy style, distinguishing words directed toward the ear and the eye. Students may not receive credit for both ENG 157 and COM 157. Prerequisite: ENG 103.

ENG 203 World Literature I (3 credits)

The course sequence (ENG 203-ENG 204) chronologically surveys major works of world literature with emphasis on Western literature and its relationship to the cultural trends of the period. A wide and varied range of readings is available to the student. The survey should lead to an awareness of the objectives and forms of literary art and to a knowledge of Western culture as great writers have mirrored it. Course covers the period from the Ancients through the Renaissance. Prerequisites: ENG 103 and ENG 104.

ENG 204 World Literature II (3 credits)

The course sequence (ENG 203-ENG 204) chronologically surveys major works of world literature with emphasis on Western literature and its relationship to the cultural trends of the period. A wide and varied range of readings is available to the student. The survey should lead to an awareness of the objectives and forms of literary art and to a knowledge of Western culture as great writers have mirrored it. Course covers the period from the Enlightenment to the present. Prerequisites: ENG 103 and ENG 104.

ENG 205 Creative Writing-Nonfiction (3 credits)

This course will allow students to explore, write, and revise original non-fiction. Topics covered will include autobiographical and biographical writing, personal essays, memoirs, literary journalism, nature and/or science writing, historical writing, magazine writing, and reviews. Students will consider and use structure, characterization, unity and rhythm, and voice and tone, along with other literary devices, in their own writing. They may also be required to attend readings of non-fiction outside of scheduled class times. Prerequisite: ENG 104 or Permission of Instructor.

ENG 206 Creative Writing-Poetry (3 credits)

Students will write and revise original poetry, considering language, imagery, rhythm, structure, point of view, story, theme, and other poetic elements. Students will study the styles and techniques of classic and contemporary poets. They may also be required to attend poetry readings in the area. This course does not fulfill a Humanities' literature requirement. Prerequisite: ENG 104 or Permission of Instructor.

ENG 207 Creative Writing-Fiction (3 credits)

Students will write and revise original fiction, both segments and complete stories, using language, dialogue, character development, action, setting, and plot in the service of a theme or message. Students will read and view the styles and techniques of classic and contemporary writers of fiction. They may also be required to attend readings of fiction in the area. This course does not fulfill a Humanities' literature requirement. Prerequisite: ENG 104 or Permission of Instructor.

ENG 208 Creative Writing-Drama/Script (3 credits)

Students will write and revise original, narrative scripts for the stage or screen, using dialogue, character development, action, setting, and plot in the service of a theme or message. Students will read and view the styles and techniques of classic and contemporary scriptwriters or playwrights. They may also be required to attend professional film, theatre, and TV productions in the area. Instructor will specify if the course focuses on scripts for the TV and film screen or for the theatre. This course does not fulfill a Humanities' literature requirement. Prerequisite: ENG 104 or Permission of Instructor.

ENG 209 Dramatic Literature I (3 credits)

A study of the early development of dramatic literature and its social relationships. First semester covers major contributions from Aeschylus to Ibsen. Prerequisites: ENG 103 and ENG 104.

ENG 210 Dramatic Literature II (3 credits)

A study of modern drama from Ibsen to the present. Either semester may be taken independently. Prerequisites: ENG 103 and ENG 104.

ENG 211 Intermediate Composition (3 credits)

This course explores the origins and development of the essay form in an academic context through the study of various historical and contemporary essays and asks students to apply this knowledge and experience to their own writing. Students will practice reading and writing different kinds of essays, explore the limits of the essay form, and practice and develop research skills. Additionally, students will become familiar with composing and revising techniques through a series of writing workshops. Students have the opportunity to leave the class as better and more versatile writers. Prerequisites: ENG 103 and ENG 104.

ENG 213 Children's Literature (3 credits)

Examines literature for children from the preschool level through the middle school level. Topics covered include history and development, research skills, criticism, major authors, and major forms: poetry, picture books, fairytales (folktales), fantasy, problem novels, multicultural, fiction and non-fiction. Emphasis is on the teaching of the knowledge and critical skills needed to locate, comprehend, analyze, evaluate, and present the literature. Prerequisites: ENG 103 and ENG 104.

ENG 215 Mythology (3 credits)

The first concern of the course is the survey of Greek and Roman mythologies: their origin, development, interpretation, and use by both classical and modern writers. In addition, some attention is given to Norse and Celtic mythologies, their relationships to classical mythology and use in British literature. Prerequisites: ENG 103 and ENG 104.

ENG 217 Science Fiction (3 credits)

An examination of Science Fiction through its major movements: Classic (pre-1930), Golden Age (1930-1959), New Wave (1960-1974), and Contemporary (1975-present). Includes the study of themes within the genre. Prerequisites: ENG 103 & ENG 104.

ENG 221 English Literature I (3 credits)

A critical and historical survey of English literature from Beowulf to the Romantic Age. Although the literature is presented historically, the central emphasis of the course is on the works themselves. Prerequisites: ENG 103 and ENG 104.

ENG 222 English Literature II (3 credits)

A critical and historical survey of English literature from the Romantic Age to the present. Although the literature is presented historically, the central emphasis of the course is on the works themselves. Prerequisites: ENG 103 and 104.

ENG 223 American Literature I (3 credits)

A critical study of major American writers of the 19th Century. The literary works are viewed in their relationship to the cultural movements and intellectual history of American civilization. Prerequisites: ENG 103 and ENG 104.

ENG 224 American Literature II (3 credits)

A study of major American writers of the 20th Century. The literary works are viewed in their relationship to the cultural movements and intellectual history of American civilization. Prerequisites: ENG 103 and ENG 104.

ENG 225 African American Literature I (3 credits)

A reading, writing, and discussion course that studies literature written by African American authors. Students read poetry, novels, short stories, plays, sermons, and folktales in order to develop their critical appreciation of literature, as well as understand the unique condition of people of African descent living in America. The first semester surveys literature written by and about African Americans from the 1750's to the 1950's. Prerequisites: ENG 103 and ENG 104.

ENG 226 Literature of the Black American II (3 credits)

A reading, writing, and discussion course which studies works by modern Black American authors of the 1960's to the present. Though the main focus of the course is on understanding literature in general, the themes of the works emphasize the special condition of Black people in America. Either semester may be taken independently. Prerequisites: ENG 103 and ENG 104.

ENG 227 Writing for Emerging Technologies (3 credits)

Fast-paced and widespread developments in technology have changed the way people distribute, access, and understand information. With the Internet serving both as a medium for text and images, and a delivery system for other kinds of digital content, competitive employees in the marketplace must be able to provide clear and effective pieces of Web-based communication and other kinds of documents. This course will discuss the issues surrounding the new technology. Topics covered in the course include First Amendment law and the Internet, "repurposing" stories across platforms, and clear writing techniques. This course may be offered online and/or face-to-face. Prerequisites: ENG 103 and ENG 104.

ENG 229 The Novel (3 credits)

A focused study of the novel examining its development, characteristics, and themes. Students will read, discuss, and write about the work of various novelists within their social, ideological, and/or historical contexts. The class will emphasize the analysis of the novel as a genre as well as its technical and formal aspects. Novels chosen for this course represent a variety of perspectives, time periods, cultures, and/or nationalities. Prerequisites: ENG 103 and ENG 104.

ENG 230 Women's Literature (3 credits)

A reading, discussion, and writing course that covers several time periods and genres to focus on the unique problems and accomplishments of women writers. Analyses of literary works will focus on gender and the cultural climate in which the studied writers worked. Prerequisites: ENG 103 and ENG 104.

ENG 231 The Bible As Literature (3 credits)

This course is an introduction to the Hebrew Bible (Old Testament) and Christian Bible (New Testament) as literary texts. It will include an examination of literary forms and genres in the Bible, the influence of non-biblical literary sources and analogues, the relationship between history and the Bible, the settings and cultures in which biblical events took place, the process by which the Bible was written and edited, and the influence of the Bible on Western literature. Prerequisites: ENG 103 and ENG 104.

ENG 233 Shakespeare (3 credits)

An introduction to the study of Shakespeare's dramatic and poetic corpus, this course will present students with the opportunity to interpret and analyze his work. A variety of interpretive lenses will be used to better understand Shakespeare's work in both his time and our own. Readings will include representative sonnets and the three major genres of the drama. Film adaptations may be used to supplement the reading material. Prerequisites: ENG 103 and ENG 104.

ENG 239 American Folklore (3 credits)

This course investigates types of folklore found in the United States, including aspects such as definition, classification, origin, variation, and function in contemporary culture. It explores how traditions (oral, customary, and material folklore) develop within any group of people who share a common interest, experience or background, whether it be race, ethnicity, region, occupation, class, family, age, gender, sexual orientation, (dis)ability, special interest, etc. Through readings, films, and discussion focused on examples of diverse groups, students will learn how the lore of a group both expresses and shapes the experience, concerns, and values of the group. Students will collect, classify, analyze, and share the traditions of their own groups as well. Learning to recognize the dynamics of folklore within their own groups, students will gain the skills necessary to understand and respect the traditions of groups other than their own. Prerequisites: ENG 103 and ENG 104.

ENG 241 American Autobiography As Literature (3 credits)

A survey of American autobiographies during the nation's history. The class will examine the cultural issues raised by each autobiographer's quest for identity, and investigate the ways autobiographers shape their lives in words.

ENG 245 New Immigrant Literature (3 credits)

This course examines literature reflecting the American experience of immigrants and expressing their search for roots and cultural identity, both in the U.S. and in journeys back to their homelands. The class will explore cultural issues raised in fiction, poetry, drama, and memoirs of writers from a number of countries. Discussion and writing assignments will focus on both analyzing the literature and on examining the students' experiences. Prerequisites: ENG 103 and ENG 104.

ENG 250 Voices of Diversity (3 credits)

Studies of the pride and prejudice encountered by minority groups in American culture, as expressed in literature and film. At least three of the following "voices", their songs and their outcries, will be heard each semester: the gay and lesbian voice; the Asian-American voice; the Hispanic voice; the Jewish voice; the new immigrant voice; the Native American voice; the voices of the homeless, the drugged, the disenfranchised, and other minority voices. Prerequisites: ENG 103 and ENG 104.

ENG 251 News Writing (3 credits)

An introductory course in the basics of news reporting and writing, focusing on gathering information, story and sentence structure, accuracy, Associated Press style, and meeting deadlines. Students will write a variety of publication-ready news stories, including college-related events and student public interest stories. Students may not receive credit for both ENG 251 and COM 251. Prerequisite: ENG 103.

ENG 252 Feature Writing and Literary Journalism (3 credits)

Students will analyze and evaluate feature stories and writing in the genre of literary journalism. Drawing on techniques from the New Journalism, current models of literary journalism, and sound reporting practices, students will write a variety of publication-ready features, including profiles, critiques, and human interest stories. Students may not receive credit for both ENG 252 and COM 252. Prerequisite: ENG 103.

ENG 253 Student Media Editing (2 credits)

This course provides academic credit to students who serve in editorial roles for student-run college media. Tasks can include assignment and placement of stories; feedback to student reporters; and copyediting, proofreading, and editing of final stories. Students may not receive credit for both ENG 253 and COM 253. Prerequisite: ENG/COM 123 or Permission of Instructor. Web enhanced course; online assignments are required.

ENG 259 Report and Technical Writing (3 credits)

A course that provides training in the preparation of professional and technical written reports. Attention is paid to the development of the student's ability to design a coherent report, to organize ideas, and to understand and use specific forms, stylistic conventions, and standard language. Prerequisites: ENG 103 and ENG 104.

ENG 282 Introduction to Critical Theory (3 credits)

The goal of this course is to introduce students to several schools of critical theory widely used in literary analysis, including deconstruction, post-colonialism, feminism, Marxism, semiotics, and psychoanalysis. By the end of this course, students will be familiar with the major arguments and questions of the schools studied. This coverage will include where ideas intersect across schools, key debates at the heart of critical analysis, and practical applications. Most usefully, students will complete the course by performing analytical tasks in at least two critical schools. Prerequisites: ENG 103 and ENG 104.