List of Courses

ASL 101 American Sign Language I (3 credits)

This learner-centered course is designed for students with little or no previous knowledge of American Sign Language. Students acquire basic grammatical and lexical skills that will enable them to communicate in routine social or professional situations within an authentic cultural context. Upon successful completion of ASL 101, students may enroll in ASL 102. This course also fulfills the Global Awareness requirement at Onondaga.

ASL 102 American Sign Language II (3 credits)

This course is a sequel to American Sign Language I. It builds upon the basic grammatical, linguistic, communicative and cultural concepts learned in ASL 101. Upon successful completion of ASL 102, students may enroll in ASL 201. This course also fulfills the Global Awareness requirement at Onondaga. Prerequisite: ASL 101, or two to three years of high school ASL, or Permission of Instructor.

ASL 201 American Sign Language III (3 credits)

This dynamic course draws upon previously acquired knowledge, while introducing students to more complex grammatical and lexical structures to further develop communicative proficiency and cultural knowledge. This course is conducted mostly in American Sign Language. Upon successful completion of ASL 201, students may enroll in ASL 202. This course also fulfills the Global Awareness requirement at Onondaga. Prerequisite: ASL 102, or three-four years of high school ASL, or Permission of Instructor.

ASL 202 American Sign Language IV (3 credits)

This course is a sequel to American Sign Language III. It expands upon complex grammatical and lexical structures. It is conducted entirely in American Sign Language and provides a solid foundation for advanced study. Upon completion of ASL 202, students may enroll in any intermediate-high level course. Students who successfully complete the 202 level have fulfilled their language requirement for the A.A. in Humanities and Teacher Prep programs. The three additional credits may be taken either as a language course or as a general elective. This course also fulfills the Global Awareness requirement at Onondaga. Prerequisite: ASL 201, or five years of high school ASL, or Permission of Instructor.

ASL 203 Advanced American Sign Language I (3 credits)

This intermediate-high level course is a sequel to American Sign Language IV (ASL 202). It expands upon complex grammatical and lexical structures for improved communication. This course gives emphasis to semantics and focuses on various structures of ASL discourse. Students will continue to learn and use vocabulary, fingerspelling, numbers, and grammatical features of ASL. It is conducted entirely in ASL and provides a solid foundation for advanced study. This course also fulfills the Global Awareness requirement at Onondaga. Prerequisite: ASL 202 or Permission of Instructor.

ASL 204 Advanced American Sign Language II (3 credits)

This course is a sequel to American Sign Language V (ASL 203). It incorporates intermediate-high American Sign Language (ASL), vocabulary, grammatical features, and sophisticated discourse features as they relate to narratives of ASL. It expands upon complex grammatical and lexical structures learned in previous courses. This course gives emphasis to semantics and English idioms for expressing concepts in ASL. Information based on cultural issues in the Deaf community will continue to be examined. This course is conducted entirely in ASL and provides a solid foundation for advanced study. This course also fulfills the Global Awareness requirement at Onondaga. Prerequisite: ASL 203 or Permission of Instructor.

ASL 206 Processing Skills Development (3 credits)

This course is an introduction to the mental processing skills (pre-interpreting skills) of consecutive and simultaneous interpretation. It includes an overview of the theoretical models of interpretation, provides skill development activities for isolated interpreting sub-tasks and practice activities for the integration of these tasks in translation and consecutive interpreting activities. Course content includes interpreting theory, message analysis, and text analysis. The subskills addressed in this course include visualization, listening comprehension, shadowing, paraphrasing, dual task training, and structuring. Prerequisite: ASL 203 or Permission of Instructor.

ASL 210 Introduction to the Field of Interpreting (3 credits)

This course introduces students to the profession of sign language interpreting. It covers the history of interpreting as a field of professional practice, and introduces students to the Code of Professional Conduct and terminology related to the field. Theoretical models of interpreting, employment options in regard to various settings, function of assessing as part of the interpreting process, impact of legislation on the field, and cumulative trauma disorders (CTDs) are explored. Additional topics include the phenomena of cross-cultural dynamics, oppression of minority groups, and the role of an interpreter as cultural mediator. Prerequisite: ASL 200 or 202 or Permission of Instructor.

ASL 211 Fingerspelling and Numbers Skill Development (3 credits)

This course is designed to develop intermediate receptive and expressive fingerspelling and number skills. This course provides an avenue to improved fingerspelled word and number recognition by providing theoretical information; practice in specific skills that underlie the fingerspelled whole word and phrase recognition process; identification of fingerspelled words and numbers in context; management strategies to request repetition of fingerspelled words and numbers; and production of short narratives that include fingerspelling, lexicalized fingerspelling, and numbers. Expressive skills focus on the development of speed, clarity, and fluency. Prerequisite: ASL 202 or Permission of Instructor.

ASL 212 Deafhood: Moving Beyond Deaf Culture (3 credits)

At the intermediate-high level, this course provides students with a new, deeper perspective on Deaf people who use American Sign Language (ASL) and their culture. Deafhood is a recent term coined by Paddy Ladd to encompass the "brotherhood" that is evident in many Deaf cultures around the world, including American Deaf culture. The course is based on a cultural model as an alternative to the pathological model, and analyzes the history of the Deaf community in historical terms of colonialism and anthropological terms of language, culture, education, arts, social rules, and values. Class is conducted entirely in American Sign Language. Prerequisite: ASL 202 or equivalent, or Permission of Instructor.

 ASL 213 ASL Literature & Film (3 credits) Starting Fall 2013

Students will explore selected works of American Sign Language literature and film, analyzing and critiquing them in terms of the historical, social, cultural, and artistic journeys of the American Deaf community and the individuals within the community. Various ASL literature genres will be studied, including but not limited to poems, jokes, and stories. Students will apply knowledge of ASL, storytelling techniques, and literary techniques to decode works of ASL literature and film. Additionally, students will create poems and stories in ASL using appropriate techniques and language skills. Prerequisite: ASL 202 or POI 

ASL 215 American Sign Language Literature and Film (3 credits)

Students will explore selected works of American Sign Language literature and film, and analyze and critique them in terms of the historical, social, cultural, and artistic journey of the American Deaf community and the individuals within the community. Various ASL literature genres will be studied, including but not limited to poems, jokes, and stories. Students will apply knowledge of ASL, storytelling techniques, and literary techniques to decode works of ASL literature and film. Additionally, students will create poems and stories in ASL using appropriate techniques and language skills. Prerequisite: ASL 202 or Permission of Instructor.

ASL 247 Linguistics of American Sign Language (3 credits)

This course is an introduction to the basic grammatical and linguistic structures of American Sign Language. Students will examine the basic linguistic features of ASL phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, and the use of language. Language variation, discourse, bilingualism, and language contact will also be included. Prerequisite: ASL 102 or equivalent, or Permission of Instructor.